Film Screening 16th September, 2011

Poster for Snowtown

Snowtown 

8:00 PM, 16th September, 2011
No Guests

  • MA
  • 120 mins
  • 2011
  • Justin Kurzel
  • Shaun Grant, Justin Kurzel
  • Daniel Henshall, ┬áLucas Pittaway, Craig Coyne

** DUE TO CIRCUMSTANCES BEYOND OUR CONTROL, THIS SCREENING HAS BEEN POSTPONED FROM ITS ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED DATE AND WILL NOW BE SCREENING ON FRIDAY 16 SEPTEMBER AT 8 PM. FOR MORE DETAILS, CLICK http://www.anufg.org.au/read/6457/screening-change-snowtown-psycho-on-saturday.html[HERE].**

I used to work in Port Pirie and Port Broughton in the mid-90s and, on my frequent trips to and from my hometown of Adelaide for weekends, I would always pass through the small, seemingly pleasant villa of Snowtown. Little did I know that I was regularly driving within metres of an abandoned bank building housing the remains of the most prolific serial killings in Australia's history...

Abused teenager Jamie (newcomer Pittaway) is searching for a father figure amongst the resignation and hopelessness of Adelaide's northern suburbs. He finds one in the charismatic John Bunting (Henshall), a man whose regular rants on those he sees as the scum of society - a wide range from paedophiles to heroin addicts and obese women - merely scratch the surface of a deeper, more disturbing set of beliefs and actions.

When I went to see Snowtown, the woman at the box office told me that an elderly couple had gone to see it recently, expecting 'a nice story set in the Snowy Mountains'. As hilarious as I find that story, I feel it is my duty to warn you away from this movie if you can't take intense examinations of evil. If you can take it, however, this brilliantly acted and shot movie is essential viewing, in order to remind us that the parts of society we like to walk away from and ignore do in fact exist. Up there with The Boys and Chopper as an unflinching look at Australian crime, this is finely crafted but disturbing cinema. You have been warned.

Travis Cragg

Poster for Psycho Promotional Trailer (Short Film)

Psycho Promotional Trailer (Short Film) 

10:15 PM, 16th September, 2011

  • NR
  • 7 mins
  • 1960
  • Alfred Hitchcock

** DUE TO CIRCUMSTANCES BEYOND OUR CONTROL, THIS SCREENING HAS BEEN POSTPONED FROM ITS ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED DATE AND WILL NOW BE SCREENING ON FRIDAY 16 SEPTEMBER AT APPROXIMATELY 10:15 PM. FOR MORE DETAILS, CLICK http://www.anufg.org.au/read/6457/screening-change-snowtown-psycho-on-saturday.html[HERE].**

A special treat for fans of Hitchcock and Psycho! Hitch takes us on a tour of the Bates house and motel featured in the film, giving us teasing clues as to what we are going to be in for over the next two hours or so. It's a unique trailer, and Hitch's droll commentary is a treat.

(And remember, it's the picture you MUST see from the beginning... or not at all!)

Poster for Psycho

Psycho  

10:22 PM, 16th September, 2011

  • M
  • 108 mins
  • 1960
  • Alfred Hitchcock
  • Joseph Stefano
  • Anthony Perkins, ┬áJanet Leigh, Vera Miles

** DUE TO CIRCUMSTANCES BEYOND OUR CONTROL, THIS SCREENING HAS BEEN POSTPONED FROM ITS ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED DATE AND WILL NOW BE SCREENING ON FRIDAY 16 SEPTEMBER AT APPROXIMATELY 10:15 PM. FOR MORE DETAILS, CLICK http://www.anufg.org.au/read/6457/screening-change-snowtown-psycho-on-saturday.html[HERE].**

The master of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, has many great films under his belt - Rear Window, Vertigo and The Birds to name a few. The list could go on but his definitive work, and the one that paved the way for every shock, horror and thriller director today is this: 1960s Psycho.

The film starts with Marion Crane (Leigh) embezzling $40,000 from her employer and fleeing the city. Along the way she stops in at the Bates Motel, run by owner Norman Bates (the delightfully creepy and unsettling Perkins). From there the film veers 'sharply' away from its initial storyline and becomes an unexpected tale of mystery, murder and deceit. To say any more would spoil it for those who have never had the pleasure of seeing this groundbreaking classic.

A true treat to watch again on the big screen, John L. Russell's gorgeous black and white cinematography still holds you on the edge of your seat and the technical trickery employed by Hitchcock still dazzles fifty years later. If you've always wondered what all the fuss is about, now is your chance to find out. Or even if you just want to spend another night in the shadow of that house, I encourage you to come along and check in one more time.

Oh, and make sure to invite your mother.

Daniel Eisenberg